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Thread: Does anyone buy Topps cards from these years anymore?

  1. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by mm1sub View Post
    Technology is big part of the reason why kids do not collect today but price may be a bigger reason. Like Jay was saying, you used to see cards for sale everywhere. Not it is really only shops and the big retail stores. A box of Topps base cards will run you 50.00 to 60.00 dollars. This is an adult hobby now and it will never go back to the way it was when we were growing up.
    Prices of new packs and boxes is one of the things that really mystifies me.. While there are many less collectors than in years past (lower demand) the prices of new cards have skyrocketed. Yes, I know card companies produce less of them and have perfected the art of manufacturing scarcity but I still do not get it.

    What is the way it was back when we were kids is being able to buy cards on the secondary market for low amounts not seen since the late 70s-early 80s. Everyone is selling and very few are buying so it is an absolute buyer's market for those still in the hobby as collectors.

  2. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by SymphonicMetal View Post
    Prices of new packs and boxes is one of the things that really mystifies me.. While there are many less collectors than in years past (lower demand) the prices of new cards have skyrocketed. Yes, I know card companies produce less of them and have perfected the art of manufacturing scarcity but I still do not get it.

    What is the way it was back when we were kids is being able to buy cards on the secondary market for low amounts not seen since the late 70s-early 80s. Everyone is selling and very few are buying so it is an absolute buyer's market for those still in the hobby as collectors.
    My sentiment exactly. When I was growing up this was, for the most part, a kids hobby. Now no matter what anyone tells you this is a hobby for adults. I will never stop collecting but my children have absolutely no interest whatsoever in cards. When I am at a store like Wal Mart or Target I never see kids looking at sports cards. They are much more interested in Magic or Pokémon cards. I just wonder if we will reach a point where Topps finally goes out of business and we are left with nothing.
    1975 Topps Minis: 362/660 55% complete
    1972 Topps: 762/787 97% complete
    1971 Topps: 678/752 90% complete
    1960 Topps: 500/572 87% complete

  3. #18
    It is interesting and fun reading everyone's thoughts. I have enjoyed collecting cards since the mid '70's. I got out of it around 1991, when the market went from three brands to about 50 brands. There was just no way I was going to be able to buy or collect every single card of every single set. I didn't collect anything from 1992 up until about 2007, when my son got into baseball cards. And, that reset the fire in me.

    My brothers and I probably had 15-20,000 doubles from the '60's-'70s, and I was able trade a majority of them to now have a complete, or near complete set, from 1992 up til now. I need fifteen cards of the base sets, not including 2016. It was always fun for me, and I was hoping my son would enjoy it too. He collected for about 4-5 years before he lost interest. But, as most of said, I've come to realize it is a rich man's hobby and that's sad. Personally, I don't know how people have so many parallel's, medallions, so on and so forth. It has to be expensive to have all of them. And, as other's have said, you don't see kids buying baseball cards. They can't afford it. I wish stores would drop the prices and make it more affordable for kids. It was fun buying them as a kid, and trading with your friends.

    I have been amazed to come across several people still looking for cards from the '80's and I am more than happy to help them. I am still looking for Traded and a few parallel's from the '80's, but I don't need much. I am hoping that people will join the hobby, because it is fun. I'd hate to see the hobby end.

  4. #19
    Part of the allure of cards back in the day(at least for me) was that they were one of a handful of sources someone could use to connect to players in terms of a compilation of statistics as well as putting a face to the names in the morning box scores.

    Compare this with today.

    With modern communiction systems, one could see any game at any time. For $100 per year you can subscribe to any one of several tv/device packages and watch every game you wish (well, except when any team plays the Yankees here in upstate New York).

    Statistics? You can google them in an instant. No longer does one have to hold a card and look on the back to see how many home runs Jim Rice had in 1978.

    This reality needs to be considered when discussing the decline of our hobby.

  5. #20
    Jay touched on some things that I was thinking about earlier in the day as to how accessible big time sports is today vs 30-40 years ago. Back then, the players seemed larger than life. Much of this perception was the fact that information was much harder to come by. How many of us would race to the daily paper to read the box scores or get the top 5 league leaders? And on Sunday the big thing was the comprehensive baseball stats that we would spend hours going over. And to see an out of town team you would tune into the Game of the Week. And getting The Sporting News weekly in the mail meant you were really on top of things. Throw in the fact that the world was a much bigger place and we as kids were awe struck by our teams and our favorite players.

    But even with the great exposure of and accessibility to today's pro sports, I think the percentage of kids who really follow sports is much lower than kids of previous generations. And for those that are interested in pro sports, cards would be a rather ancient way of keeping up with them. Only if a kid has a nostalgic streak in them (which I did as a kid) would they even bother with cards.

    Two ways of telling if a guy is old is if they collect cards and like Hard Rock and/or metal music. Well since I collect cards and my username gives away my music genre of choice............ I guess that means....................I'M OLD!

  6. #21
    thank you all for your thoughts. it is fun and interesting to read everyones thoughts on this. some very, very good posts! I was thinking the other day how cool it would be to lets say buy a wax box of 1987 topps just to relive the memory of what it was like to open wax packs! (i wont eat the gum this time!) i also wonder if anyone here has any topps complete set runs for example every topps set from 1951-2016?
    John 3:16 -"For God so loved the world that he gave his one and only Son, that whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life"

  7. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by Hawaiian BamBam View Post
    thank you all for your thoughts. it is fun and interesting to read everyones thoughts on this. some very, very good posts! I was thinking the other day how cool it would be to lets say buy a wax box of 1987 topps just to relive the memory of what it was like to open wax packs! (i wont eat the gum this time!) i also wonder if anyone here has any topps complete set runs for example every topps set from 1951-2016?
    I have a complete run from 1973 -2016 with the exception of some of the high priced variations (Frank Thomas NNOF) and some of the SP's from recent years. My 1972 Topps set is nearly complete and I am hoping to knock that one out this year. I have no interest however in opening a box of 1987 Topps.
    1975 Topps Minis: 362/660 55% complete
    1972 Topps: 762/787 97% complete
    1971 Topps: 678/752 90% complete
    1960 Topps: 500/572 87% complete

  8. #23
    When I got back into the hobby (1992), I bought wax boxes of 86/87/88/89/90/91 to build the sets and of course, I now have monster boxes filled with junk wax, but that is okay. It was a relatively cheap, fun way to get back into the hobby. I have a box of wax from every year from 1986 forward stashed away, also have some loose packs every year from 1985 going back to 1972 - those are getting harder and harder to find every day.

    My ultimate goal is a Topps set for every year from 1969 to the present - I have 9 more years to knock out - some are much closer to completion than others.

    Now I try and get a pack here and there for my son to open and he loves it, he has his own little collection of cards that he free to do whatever he wants with.
    Building Topps sets from 1969 to the present. Always looking for Puckett cards.

    Bench User Page has my most wanted and trade lists for 2011/12 Topps

    wantlists updated, new player tradelists added.
    http://www.katester44.webs.com/

    Kirby Puckett havelist:
    https://spreadsheets.google.com/ccc?...sH&hl=en#gid=0

  9. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by Hawaiian BamBam View Post
    thank you all for your thoughts. it is fun and interesting to read everyones thoughts on this. some very, very good posts! I was thinking the other day how cool it would be to lets say buy a wax box of 1987 topps just to relive the memory of what it was like to open wax packs! (i wont eat the gum this time!) i also wonder if anyone here has any topps complete set runs for example every topps set from 1951-2016?




    I am working on mine from 1977-current, only set not complete is the 1980. am working on the traded sets also, still have some holes tho.

    as for the 87 topps.......hellz yeah!! I almost got a wax case last summer for $100 but was $25 short and the seller would not budge from the $100. 87 still to this day is my favorite set with 89 upper deck a very close second.
    Last edited by steve1972; 01-25-2017 at 08:25 PM.
    working on 2011 topps diamond, cognac, walmart parallel sets.

    wantlist:
    http://cardboardauthority.forumotion...ing-sets#18145

    tradelist:
    http://www.thebenchtrading.com/showt...sts?highlight=

  10. #25
    If I get a good deal on some boxes, I buy them. Like I picked up a 1987 Topps rack case for $40 a few years back. And my LCS had a Black Friday deal a couple years ago, 1988 Topps wax boxes for $5 each or 3 for $10. And I'll put together the set from that, picking up singles if I need them to finish it off.

    I still buy some for autographing purposes, but I don't typically go out looking specifically for a 1982 Topps Dave Chalk-- just anything I can find to get signed by him regardless of year/set.
    AUTOGRAPH TRADE LIST | AUTOGRAPH WANT LIST | BLOG | INDOOR SOCCER PROJECT

    Always open to trade! Message me if you have something I need (or vice versa)

  11. #26
    When I collected, I did the same as many of you guys have said, picked up cards of players I liked, regardless of year, etc. That was more or less how i started, trading with the other kids at school and in the neighborhood for players I liked best. Of course it was the Cubs, Sox, and Bears in those days, as I am from LaGrange, outside of Chicago. As I got older and collected more, it was players from certain championship teams, eras, etc. I got into some customs most recently, though I really lost the desire to continue following our 3rd child's birth, too busy and having too much fun with them. If any of my kids like cards, then I may dip right back into it.

    Cards remind me of my childhood, and while I dont collect anything anymore, I have really enjoyed staying in touch with the hobby and with some friends on the bench! Its been 6 years since I joined, and I am always glad I did! I dont have facebook, and my wife kids me that the bench is my version of facebook!

    I also agree with a few different posts: this is NOT a cheap hobby! In the 80s it was 50 cents per pack on average, and I remember the card shop right next door to my Aunt and Uncle's beauty parlor selling single cards. I think I picked up Payton, Perry, and McMahon from the 86 Topps football set for 25 cents each, and thinking I got the bargain of a lifetime!

    Today, packs are more, individual cards are more, and local card shops are very few and far between. We dont really have convenience stores in our town now in Southern Illinois, walmart is the best bet for packs. As a child, they were everywhere, gas stations, etc. but I think the counter space that once held baseball cards has really been designated now for other things, like 5 hour energy! Not as much desire for it from kids, and it makes me sad. Occasionally, I will have students come in and comment on the cards I have displayed in my offices (I am a school social worker), and it is fun to talk to them about their collections, etc. but VERY few kids collect anymore, I can attest to that firsthand (some see the cards and say "what are those?").

    Maybe the next generation will see them differently, but as of now, I think its probably those of us who remember them fondly from our childhood. Its those memories I wouldnt trade for anything!

    God bless,

    Kevin
    Last edited by KCLJ520; 01-26-2017 at 03:35 PM.
    "For nothing will be impossible for God" ~ Luke 1:37

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